Provinces

The Canadian Orthopaedic Association (COA) is proud to count on provincial orthopaedic associations and institutions as their partners. Over the last two years, COA conducted a national virtual tour to 10 provinces and engaged with over 300 surgeons. Members of the orthopaedic community met to represent their province’s current needs, as a result of the pandemic.

ALBERTA

Coming soon.

BRITISH COLUMBIA

Coming soon.

MANITOBA

  • Lack of training new recruits, many redeployments and retirements have led to staff shortages on care team.
  • Bed closures, cancelled complex cases are a direct result of nursing shortages.
  • Virtual care has proven successful in the area.

NEW BRUNSWICK

  • Anesthesia shortages causing bottlenecks for surgery and operating room time.
  • Resource disparity between hospital systems. No effective allocation or shared resources.
  • Job scarcity. Early career surgeons are underemployed and leaving the province in search of opportunity.

NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR

  • Access to care disparity, growing patient waitlist especially for hip fractures from aging population.
  • Orthopaedic departments blamed for inefficiencies on ground level. • Nursing shortages and burnout.

NOVA SCOTIA

  • Lack of primary care physicians poses logistical and ethical challenges later when addressing specific health issues related to orthopaedic care.
  • Early career surgeons not able to train effectively, make connections and collaborations from being in virtual environment.
  • Care team fatigue.

ONTARIO

  • Job scarcity. Surgeons are foregoing retirement, creating job shortages. • Disparity in resource allocation, both regionally and specific to specialty.
  • Orthopaedics deemed a low priority.
  • Nursing and anesthesia shortages.

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND

  • Allocation and prioritization of resources.
  • Orthopaedic care considered low priority.

QUEBEC

  • Prioritization of orthopaedic procedures, while breaking perception that these are lifestyle surgery or elective (optional, by choice) procedures.
  • Critical shortage of nurses and ancillary staff, impedes hospitals to perform outpatient orthopaedics.
  • Surgeons have successful models that improve efficiencies, but many are not implemented by administration.

SASKATCHEWAN

  • Strained healthcare practitioners during COVID-19.
  • General discouragement and confusion how to advocate for better access to care in orthopaedics.
  • Nursing shortages, both on the floor and operating rooms.
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